Hallway Floor (New Hardwood Flooring To Match Original Flooring)

As you know, my attempt last week to finish the parquet in the corridors was a catastrophic mistake. It didn’t occur to me that the hardwood floor in my home could have changed color over the years, so instead of adapting the new color floor to the old one, I simply plowed the project using exactly the same process, products, and colors that I was using when I reworked the floor a few years ago. This led to this Catastrophe.

If you want to know more about my stubbornness and determination to move forward, even though my eyes could see that things were not working with each new step, you can read this here…

Corridor floor progress (and disaster)
So I had to correct this terrible mess last weekend. It took hours of grinding (more on that in a Minute) and some painstaking color adjustments, but it worked fine this time. Here is the floor what it looks like this morning…

Isn’t it so much better?! It’s not perfect (it would never be perfect with a brand new finish next to a multi-year finish), but I’m pretty excited about the results.

(Note: If you’re reading this post on a site other than Addicted 2), it means you’re reading on a site that steals my Blog content. I hope you watch me on my real blog by clicking here.)

This is the second time I have dealt with this project…

Obviously, I had to get this terrible exit from the ground. I took out my five-inch rotary grinder, and with a couple of 60-grit grinding wheels, I started sanding the finish around the walls. My intention was to use the rotary grinder on the edges and then use my hand belt grinder on the main areas of the ground.

But when I sanded, I realized how scratched the floor was. There were scratches everywhere, although the last time I had sanded with the belt sander up to 120 grains. The fact is that I do not use the sander very well. It’s incredibly powerful, and I have trouble controlling it, and so I ended up with all these scratches everywhere.

As I didn’t want to make any mistakes this time, I decided to ditch the belt sander and sand the entire floor with my 5 inch disc sander. That way I was able to focus on getting all those scratches off the floor and finish this time with a much smoother floor. It took forever (six hours of grinding), but it was worth it!

I also sanded a little behind the new floor. There was an original floor directly in the music room, which was naturally darker than the rest. I thought it was a good transition board. Since it is naturally darker, it would be less noticeable if the color of this board fell only slightly from the side of the corridor. So I removed the finish up to this board with a hand scraper.

This time I took the time to make some samples of stains. A new idea, right?

From left to right, these four samples (all with Minwax penetrate stain) are: (1) 50% honey and 50% special nut, (2) 20% honey and 80% special nut, (3) 100% honey, (4) 100% special nut.

At first I thought honey was the winner, but when I saw more, I saw that it contained a little more red than the original soil. So I went with the 50% honey and 50% special nut mixture. Seen on the Floor…

It still looked a little redder than the original floor, but I thought I could make final color corrections with the paint I mix with the first layer of polyurethane.

As I had to cut the red, I decided to test my original polyurethane blend (polyurethane and mixed dye 8:1, with a dye blend that is 50% dark walnut and 50% special walnut). After testing this on the sample board, it looked like the perfect combination

I applied that first coat of the polyurethane / stain mixture with a normal brush so I could completely control how dark it looked. I would rather make a thin coat and have it too light and have to follow it with a second coat than get too thick and dark with the first coat.

A coat seemed right. Unfortunately, I forgot to take a picture of what it looked like after the first layer of polyurethane / stain mixture. But it was like that, after applying the second layer of simple polyurethane. Of course, it was very shiny when wet, and I only hoped and prayed that the satin polyurethane would match the original floor quite well when dried.

There’s a little difference in The sheen, but I think The sheen gets dull pretty quickly, so I’m not too worried about it.

I’m so relieved I finished this! Now it only remains to heal for a while (72 hours, I think) before you can handle a lot of traffic. So I will discuss with other projects around the house, then I will go back here and finish the hallway. I need to install a door, install panels (door body, skirting boards and crown), prime and paint the walls and touch up the paint on the cabinets.

This hallway has been in this unfinished state for over a year, so I am very happy to have a nice hallway again, especially now that the bedroom is ready.

If you want more details on how I finished the floor, you will find all this information in my original articles that I wrote when I reworked all the floors a few years ago. You can find them here:

 

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